Sonic Boom! Dr. Christine Darden to Speak at VCU

Events

Sonic Boom! Dr. Christine Darden to Speak at VCU

Christine Darden, Ph.D., a retired NASA mathematician, data analyst and aeronautical engineer who is featured in “Hidden Figures: The Story of the African-American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race,” a 2016 book by Margot Lee Shetterly, will visit Virginia Commonwealth University in April. Darden will speak from 4:15 to 5:15 p.m. on Friday, April […]

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VCU Mathematics Colloquium 9-23-2016

What Comes Next After 2, 4, 6, 3, 9, 12, 8, 10? Confessions of a Sequence Addict Neil J. A. Sloane The OEIS Foundation Friday, Sept 23 3:00 – 3:50 Academic Learning Commons 2201 The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (or OEIS, oeis.org) is a free web site that contains information about a quarter of […]

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VCU Mathematics Colloquium 3-25-16

Dendritic cells (DCs) are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual’s immune response to cancer. In this talk, I will describe how we can use mathematical models to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells and tumor cells. In order to design an efficient treatment strategy, clinicians need to answer three questions: How […]

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VCU Mathematics Colloquium 2-29-16

From a network of 10,000 neurons to a smartphone app with 125,000 users: linking scales in biological rhythms Prof Daniel Forger University of MichiganMonday, February 29 4:00- 4;50 Academic Learning Commons 2104 I will briefly describe mathematical models of neurons and chemical reactions within neurons that generate daily (circadian) timekeeping. In particular, we will focus […]

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Mathematical modeling of intercellular calcium dynamics

Prof Gregory D. Smith College of William & Mary Friday, November 13, 2:00-2:50 Academic Learning Commons 2100 In most cell types the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has integrative and regenerative properties analogous to the excitable membranes of neurons. Considerable insight into ER “calcium excitability” has been obtained through the development of mathematical models of calcium signaling […]

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Using Mathematics to Understand the Brain

Prof Sharon Crook Arizona State University Friday, October 23 2:00-2:50 Academic Learning Commons 2100 How does the brain work? What does it do? Mathematical models of neural processes form the basis of computational studies that aim to explain how the brain represents and processes information. These computational models are created with the goal of explaining […]

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Graduate School Bound? First year graduate student?

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship Opportunity for Students Application Deadline: October 30, 2015 A higher percentage of applications submitted by students in mathematics will result in a higher number of NSF graduate fellowships allocated to our students in future years. The NSF offered 2,050 students Graduate Research Fellowships for 2015, with only 60 or about 3% […]

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BAMM!

Biology and Medicine through Mathematics Upcoming Conference at VCU May 20-22, 2016 This conference will focus on recent developments in mathematical biology and medicine.  The conference will include plenary talks, breakout sessions and a poster session. Plenary Speakers Bard Ermentrout – University of Pittsburgh Leah Edelstein-Keshet – University of British Columbia James Keener – University […]

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CSD 7: Computational Methods for Carbon Nanostructure Research

Seventh in a cross-disciplinary workshop series that brings together researchers in Mathematical, Physical and Life Sciences to explore the increasingly diverse ways that computers are used as part of the scientific discovery process. The workshop will combine formal lectures, short talks, and ample time for informal discussions. The basic scientific objective of the workshop is […]

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Why Difference Equations are Much More Important Than Differential Equations?

Prof Doron Zeilberger: Why Difference Equations are Much More Important Than Differential Equations? The short answer is that difference equations deal with the discrete, and differential equations deal with the continuous, and both our mathematical and physical universes are inherently discrete. For the longer answer attend the talk! Friday, April 17 3:00 – 4:00 Temple […]

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